Job 40 15 - 19 What about the Dinosaurs? A Biblical view on Dinosaurs Dinosaurs for Dummies

Copyright © Dinosaurs for Dummies - 2015



Home     Key Thoughts     Evidence      Why     Contact

Evidence Index     Dinosaur Links     Sea Captains     The Bible     Dragon or Dinosaur?

Greek Historian     Josephus     Roman Historian     John of Damascus     Apollonius

Marco Polo     Ulysses     Welsh Dragons     Leviathan     Fire Breathing Dinosaurs

A Built on Rock Website Witness of Josephus

The Dart like creature is Ramphorhynchus

          


Witness of Josephus


Flying Serpents 2:10:2:245-246


‘For when the ground was difficult to be passed over, because of the multitude of serpents, (which it produces in vast numbers, and, indeed, is singular in some of those productions, which other countries do not breed, and yet such as are worse than others in power and mischief, and an unusual fierceness of sight, some of which ascend out of the ground unseen, and also fly in the air, and so come upon men at unawares, and do them a mischief...'


'...Moses invented a wonderful stratagem to preserve the army safe, and without hurt; for he made baskets, like unto arks, of sedge, and filled them with ibes, and carried them along with them; which animal is the greatest enemy to serpents imaginable, for they fly from them when they come near them; and as they fly they are caught and devoured by them, as if it were done by the harts; but the ibes are tame creatures, and only enemies to the serpentine kind: but about these ibes I say no more at present, since the Greeks themselves are not unacquainted with this sort of bird. As soon, therefore, as Moses was come to the land which was the breeder of these serpents, he let loose the ibes, and by their means repelled the serpentine kind, and used them for his assistants before the army came upon that ground.'


Pliny the Elder: who is my next witness adds support to the above accounts. He described a supposedly mythical creature as follows: "The jaculus darts from the branches of trees; and it is not only to our feet that the serpent is formidable, for these fly through the air even, just as though they were hurled from an engine." In other words like a spear from a siege engine, the bolts of which are shown below.